Local Area


Sierra Vista holds many treasures in its history that continue to astonish visitors year after year. Below you will find some of the major attractions that people come to see from around the world.

Fort Huachuca

Fort Huachuca

Fort Huachuca is a product of the Indian Wars of the 1870s and 1880s. In February 1877, Colonel August B. Kautz, commander of the Department of Arizona, ordered that a camp be established in the Huachuca Mountains. This camp would offer protection to settlers and travel routes in southeastern Arizona while simultaneously blocking the traditional Apache escape routes through the San Pedro and Santa Cruz valleys to sanctuary in Mexico. [More]

Kartchner Caverns

Experience a stunning limestone cave in Southeastern Arizona that boasts world-class features. This “live” cave, discovered in 1974, is host to a wide variety of unique minerals and formations. Water percolates from the surface and calcite formations continue to grow, including stalactites dripping down like icicles and giant stalagmites reaching up from the ground. [More]


Kartchner Caverns
Hummingbird Paradise

Hummingbird Capital of the US

Located at the center of one of the finest birding areas in the United States, Sierra Vista is often referred to as “The Hummingbird Capital of the U.S.” The mild climate, proximity to Mexico and diverse habitats, including 9,000-foot mountains and the magnificent San Pedro River Valley, make southeastern Arizona a major hot spot for rare and unusual species of birds. [More]

Local Farmers Market

The Sierra Vista Farmers Market operates a vibrant market that contributes to the success of local food growers and producers, strengthen our food economy, and provide citizens with a local alternative to corporate, globalized food production. Shoppers have access to fresh, nutritious, locally raised food. [More]


Farmers Market
Old Bisbee

Old Bisbee

Once known as “the Queen of the Copper Camps”, this Old West mining camp proved to be one of the richest mineral sites in the world, producing nearly three million ounces of gold and more than eight billion pounds of copper, not to mention the silver, lead and zinc that came from these rich Mule Mountains. By the early 1900s, the Bisbee community was the largest city between St. Louis and San Francisco. [More]

Tombstone, AZ

Tombstone. That name means many things to many people. It creates images of gunfights and dusty streets, whiskey and Faro games, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and a plethora of old western movie scenes. But what many folks don’t realize is that Tombstone Az is a living town with real inhabitants who have lived here throughout its history and still do today. That is part of the reason Tombstone has been called “The Town Too Tough to Die” [More]


Old Tombstone

Want to learn more?

For more information on events happening in the surrounding area visit Sierra Vista online.

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